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A New Era for Canadian Energy is Now
April 25-27, 2023
Edmonton Convention Centre - Edmonton, Canada

  • 7 00 AM
Registration Opens
  • 8 00 AM

CCUS Applications in Blue Hydrogen Production

Blue Hydrogen provides a pathway to a low carbon hydrogen supply chain at scale and in the near term. Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) is the enabling technology that makes Blue Hyd...

Sponsored by: : GHD

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
tuesday April 26, 2022

CCUS Applications in Blue Hydrogen Production

  • pr-alarm8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 8
Sponsored by:
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Blue Hydrogen provides a pathway to a low carbon hydrogen supply chain at scale and in the near term. Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) is the enabling technology that makes Blue Hydrogen production possible. This presentation will review the basic concept of blue hydrogen and explain the critical aspects of the “S” in CCUS technology, Storage. The processes for geological trapping of CO2, the requirements for a proper subsurface assessment, and the role of static geological modelling and dynamic reservoir simulation in the prediction of CO2 storage capacity and the future movement of CO2 will be explained. The role of Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification (MMV) is presented as critical to sequestration operations. Finally, the availability of storage space, both globally and in Alberta, is presented. This presentation will leave the audience with a basic understanding of CCUS technology, geologic conditions conducive to CO2 sequestration, the role of subsurface evaluation in demonstrating the capacity of a geologic formation to store CO2 for long periods, and the potential for CO2 sequestration in Alberta.

Presented by:
Michelle Pittenger 300x300
Michelle Pittenger CCUS Lead Geoscientist GHD
  • 9 00 AM

Dry Reforming of Methane over Novel Ni-based Catalyst Supported Gamma Alumina

Production

Global environmental changes arose by enormous amounts of greenhouse gas emissions have become a worldwide challenge. It is essential to develop a process to convert CO2 into valuable products. How...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Production

Dry Reforming of Methane over Novel Ni-based Catalyst Supported Gamma Alumina

  • pr-alarm9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Global environmental changes arose by enormous amounts of greenhouse gas emissions have become a worldwide challenge. It is essential to develop a process to convert CO2 into valuable products. However, CO2 is thermodynamically stable, and in order to convert it to any value-added product, high-energy molecules like H2 are required. Amongst all the possible technologies, catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to fuels using hydrogen has received a great deal of attention. Both CO2 and methane are stable molecules. They require a similar amount of activation energy for further processing; hence, it creates an opportunity to integrate both gasses at one processing unit at similar conditions. This calls for a revisitation of overall process integration and a holistic approach to process development. Dry methane reforming (DMR) has been an attractive technology option over the last decades due to its potential on the combined utilization of two greenhouse gases (CO2+CH4), producing a blend of H2 and CO. The produced syngas can be directly converted to synthetic long-chained (liquid fuel) using the Fischer-Tropsch process, or to useful oxygenated compounds such as ethers, aldehydes, and ketones. However, there are major obstacles towards DMR’s industrial application, primarily related to catalyst deactivation due to the concurrent occurrence of carbon formation such as direct methane pyrolysis. From an industrial standpoint, reforming of CO2-rich gas will demand a co-injection of water (bi-reforming) to reduce the chance of carbon deposition and for conversion of any higher/flexible H2/CO. ratios. Nevertheless, bi-reforming not only increases the OPEX and CAPEX of the whole process but also increases the carbon footprint. Many studies have been done on catalysts synthesized from group VIII metals including (Rh, Ru, Pt, Pd) and nickel. Although noble metals demonstrate improved catalytic activity and low coke-formation in comparison to nickel catalysts, the high cost and low availability restrict their industrial application. Methane pyrolysis leading to the massive formation of elemental carbon can be substantially hindered in the presence of materials from the second group of transition metals or alkaline earth metals. The ability of these materials as a catalyst to react with CO2 on weak basic sites leads to the creation of active carbonate species which can react with methane in the course of the DMR process. InnoTech has developed a nickel-based catalyst that is comprised of metals from transition or alkaline earth metals and exhibits high catalytic activity. The catalyst successfully converted a mixture of CO2/CH4 to syngas with more than 95% conversion rate at 800 °C along with acceptable stability even with high space velocity. The developed catalysts did not show coke formation over 300 hours of operation with no visual agglomeration of the particles and decreasing activity.

Farbod Sharif 300x300
Farbod Sharif Research Engineer, Carbon Capture, Utilization & Decarbonization Innotech Alberta
  • 9 00 AM

Enabling the Hydrogen-as-an-Energy Economy Today with Co-Combustion

End User

Hydra Energy has developed a conversion kit for Class 8 vehicles that allows for a 40-50% displacement of diesel with hydrogen. The technology went through 2 years of testing, accumulating more tha...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
tuesday April 26, 2022
End User

Enabling the Hydrogen-as-an-Energy Economy Today with Co-Combustion

  • pr-alarm9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

Hydra Energy has developed a conversion kit for Class 8 vehicles that allows for a 40-50% displacement of diesel with hydrogen. The technology went through 2 years of testing, accumulating more than 200,000 km of data, and demonstrating significant benefits for CO2 emissions, and air pollutants without sacrificing payload, power, range, or overall performance. Hydra's conversion kit is the lowest cost option for the heavy duty transport sector in Canada to reduce emissions, without sacrificing range, power, or payload capacity. The Hydra system also offers a way to enable the hydrogen-as-an-energy economy now, without relying on additional subsidies from governments. This presentation will provide an overview of the technology, share the results from Hydra's pilot projects and provide insights in how the technology can be applied in Alberta and across North America to transform the transport sector. The presentation will also showcase the benefits of co-combustion alongside other low carbon solutions like electrification, fuel cell electric vehicles, compressed natural gas vehicles and biofuels.

Jessica Verhagen 300x300
Jessica Verhagen CEO Hydra Energy
  • 9 30 AM

Aurora: Low-Cost Distributed Hydrogen

Production

Current hydrogen production is either high cost (electrolysis) or centralized (steam methane reforming). Aurora Hydrogen is developing a low-cost, distributed production technology that will enable...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Production

Aurora: Low-Cost Distributed Hydrogen

  • pr-alarm9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Current hydrogen production is either high cost (electrolysis) or centralized (steam methane reforming). Aurora Hydrogen is developing a low-cost, distributed production technology that will enable many of the projected future use cases of hydrogen. Aurora Hydrogen is developing a novel methane pyrolysis process that uses efficient microwave energy to create hydrogen and solid carbon from natural gas, without generating any CO2 emissions. The process uses a novel microwave heating technique that does not involve plasma and can operate under pressure. It also does not use a catalyst, so pure, elemental carbon particles are produced. The technology is both economic at a small scale, and inherently scalable to typical SMR volumes and beyond. Aurora is currently producing hydrogen continuously at the bench scale and plans to have a demonstration plant in operation by early 2023.

Erin Bobicki 300x300
Erin Bobicki VP & Technical Director Aurora Hydrogen
  • 9 30 AM

How Effective is Hydrogen-natural Gas Blending at Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions?

End User

Objectives/Scope: The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the greenhouse gas emission mitigation effectiveness of scenarios where hydrogen is blended with natural gas across an economy. Many ju...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
tuesday April 26, 2022
End User

How Effective is Hydrogen-natural Gas Blending at Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions?

  • pr-alarm9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

Objectives/Scope: The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the greenhouse gas emission mitigation effectiveness of scenarios where hydrogen is blended with natural gas across an economy. Many jurisdictions currently rely on natural gas for heating in homes, buildings, and industry and have developed robust transmission and distribution infrastructure to deliver it from producer to consumer. To transition to low-carbon and sustainable heating would likely require eliminating the use of natural gas and thereby the utilization of the associated developed infrastructure. We investigate using this infrastructure in Alberta, Canada, to deliver hydrogen blended with natural gas. Methods, Procedures, Process: We use an approach that is novel to this problem, using an accounting-based energy systems framework to analyse over 500 long-term scenarios. The input data is based on bottom-up engineering modelling, where the full supply chain of hydrogen use is considered, including resource extraction, hydrogen production, hydrogen transportation, hydrogen consumption, and the indirect systems affected by hydrogen production and use. The systems-based nature of the modelling accounts for indirect effects such as interactions with the electricity generation sector and upstream natural gas production. Hydrogen-natural gas blending is modelled for consumption in residential and commercial buildings, cement plants, chemical plants, petroleum refineries, in situ bitumen extraction plants, bitumen surface mining plants, bitumen upgraders, and other industries. Results, Observations, Conclusions: We found that the maximum potential to eliminate greenhouse gases in Alberta is 1-2% of present-day emissions. Blending hydrogen in natural gas networks increases energy system costs unless the carbon price is over $300/tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent. This indicates that blending low-carbon hydrogen with natural gas will increase consumer gas costs since the carbon price is expected to reach $170/tonne. We compare these results with other greenhouse gas emission pathways such as adding carbon capture and storage to existing hydrogen production; adding carbon capture and storage to existing hydrogen production provides significantly higher greenhouse gas mitigation potential and much lower costs then using low-carbon hydrogen blending with natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Alberta. The study results are meant for policymakers considering hydrogen blending as a greenhouse gas reduction pathway. Novel/Additive Information: To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to consider autothermal reforming with carbon capture as the low-carbon hydrogen in a long-term greenhouse gas emission analysis. We consider 12 hydrogen production technologies in total. The novel approach used to conduct the study may also be useful for researchers interested in greenhouse gas abatement potential and/or abatement costs or for application to other jurisdictions outside of Alberta, Canada.

Matthew Davis 300x300
Matthew Davis Research Engineer University of Alberta
  • 10 00 AM
Coffee Break & Visit Exhibition
  • 10 30 AM

DEMO4GRID Green Hydrogen Project: Demonstration of Grid Balancing and the Production of Green Hydrogen for Industrial Purposes

Production

This paper and presentation provide an overview of the latest project status of an iconic green hydrogen project and its major industrial achievements. ILF Consulting Engineers (ILF), as the owner...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Production

DEMO4GRID Green Hydrogen Project: Demonstration of Grid Balancing and the Production of Green Hydrogen for Industrial Purposes

  • pr-alarm10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

This paper and presentation provide an overview of the latest project status of an iconic green hydrogen project and its major industrial achievements. ILF Consulting Engineers (ILF), as the owner's engineer, has been engaged in engineering of DEMO4Grid project which is Europe’s largest single stack Pressurized Alkaline Electrolyzer (PAE) plant. ILF’s engagement has extended from concept through detailed design, procurement, construction, and commissioning phases of the project. The plant is built in Völs, Austria for the demonstration of grid balancing services and the production of green hydrogen for industrial purposes. The main objective of this project is the commercial setup and demonstration of a technical solution using a 3.2 MW Pressurized Alkaline Electrolyzer technology to provide grid balancing services under real operational and market conditions and the production of green hydrogen for industrial energy services. The demonstration plant is currently under commissioning and when it comes on stream in Q2 2022 it will regulate the electricity network of the regional electricity supplier TIWAG and heat the Therese Mölk Bakery of the regional food producer and trader MPREIS with green hydrogen. Furthermore, green hydrogen will be utilized in the refueling of the new hydrogen fuel cell trucks.

Nima Ghazi - ILF Consulting Engineers - Vice President Energy & Climate Protection .jpg
Nima Ghazi Vice President of Energy and Climate Protection (North America) ILF Consulting Engineers
  • 10 30 AM

A Roadmap to Clean Transportation Powered by Fuel Cell

End User

Fuel cells are an established, mature zero-emissions technology for heavy duty powertrains and their value for bus and truck applications is being recognized with growing investments by industry le...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
tuesday April 26, 2022
End User

A Roadmap to Clean Transportation Powered by Fuel Cell

  • pr-alarm10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

Fuel cells are an established, mature zero-emissions technology for heavy duty powertrains and their value for bus and truck applications is being recognized with growing investments by industry leading original equipment manufacturers. It’s clear that hydrogen will be a key player in the decarbonization of the heavy-duty transportation sector. Hydrogen fuel cell technology has come a long way from the early days. The technology has accumulated significant operational, reliability, and durability data through commercial operation in fleets. Over 3,600 Ballard-powered fuel cell buses and trucks are deployed today. To date, commercial trucks and buses with Ballard fuel cell technology inside have travelled more than 100 million kilometres on the road. To expand the reach of fuel cell technology to serve a broader range of bus and truck applications, Ballard is continuing to improve those aspects of fuel cell performance that are most critical to commercial vehicles. Attend this talk to gain a deeper understanding of Ballard’s technology targets as we continue to improve fuel cell power density, total cost of ownership and durability. Because different vehicles have different power requirements based on their size and usage, Ballard is committed to offering a complete range of fuel cell product configurations and sizes, from 45kW to 400kW over the next few years. In addition to technology improvements, this talk will address the remaining challenges to widespread deployment of fuel cell trucks and buses. Cost and availability of hydrogen must improve to reach parity with diesel. Costs must continue to drop for fuel cell systems and on-board hydrogen storage to achieve parity with incumbent diesel powertrains. With the combination of these advancements, within this decade it will become cheaper to run a fuel cell electric vehicle than it is to run a battery electric vehicle or an internal combustion engine vehicle for certain commercial applications.

Nicolas Pocard 300x300
Nicolas Pocard Vice President, Marketing and Strategic Partnerships Ballard Power Systems Inc.
  • 11 00 AM

Siemens Energy’s e-Methanol to e-Gasoline Project: Fuel from the Air at Haru Oni

Production

Methanol is a universal chemical compound that today is still being produced from coal and natural gas-derived synthesis gas (H2 and CO). In the future, non-fossil e-Methanol will see vast new appl...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm11:00 AM - 11:30 AM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Production

Siemens Energy’s e-Methanol to e-Gasoline Project: Fuel from the Air at Haru Oni

  • pr-alarm11:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Methanol is a universal chemical compound that today is still being produced from coal and natural gas-derived synthesis gas (H2 and CO). In the future, non-fossil e-Methanol will see vast new application fields. It becomes sustainable or ”green” when it is produced from renewable hydrogen of either biological (bio-methanol) or electrochemical origin (e-Methanol) and CO2. In close collaboration with customers and partners Siemens Energy is currently developing its first PtL projects, by drawing on the company’s technology expertise, its products, flexible PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) electrolysis, and its extensive solution and project management experience. The first project will be realized in Patagonia Province in Chile. The Haru Oni project will be the first commercial industrial-scale plant for production of climate-neutral e-fuels. The project takes advantage of the excellent wind conditions in southern Chile to produce carbon-neutral fuel using wind power. Final products will be e-methanol and e-gasoline, produced from methanol via methanol-to-gasoline process. The project is supported through funding by the German government and has been developed with partners such as HIF, Porsche AG, and Chilean ENAP. The project will demonstrate the Siemens Energy’s PEM electrolysis technology in an industrial scale. This paper discusses the drivers for e-Methanol production, and the manifestation of multi-party collaboration into a project that turns natural resources into conventional fuel. It will also discuss e-fuels potential for development in Canada.

Chris Norris.png
Chris Norris Director, Business Development Siemens Energy
  • 11 00 AM

Hydrogen: Safety Is Step One

End User

Hydrogen is becoming more widely viewed as the fuel of choice for medium and heavy duty vehicles. Installing hydrogen fueling infrastructure is often viewed by the affected public with concern or i...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm11:00 AM - 11:30 AM
tuesday April 26, 2022
End User

Hydrogen: Safety Is Step One

  • pr-alarm11:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

Hydrogen is becoming more widely viewed as the fuel of choice for medium and heavy duty vehicles. Installing hydrogen fueling infrastructure is often viewed by the affected public with concern or is meeting resistance due to a general perception that it is unsafe. Demonstrating that there is a well-developed framework of hydrogen safety standards reduces this level of concern and fosters wider acceptance.
The Compressed Gas Association (CGA) is focused on developing and communicating safety standards and information guiding the production, storage, transport, and use of hydrogen, particularly in the fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) industry.

The standards we develop will be incorporated by policymakers into regulations and guidelines. We need the support and active participation of players across the industry to make sure the standards we write help advance the adoption of hydrogen as a fuel and energy source.

We will be developing standards to address critical gaps we’ve identified, including:

• hydrogen system siting and personnel exposure distances
• hydrogen delivery to near-consumer use points
• noise mitigation of hydrogen venting and system operation
• updated first responder guidelines for hydrogen delivery vehicles and FCEVs
• material suitability for hydrogen service

For many years, Compressed Gas Association member companies have been global leaders in the production, storage, distribution, and application of hydrogen. CGA published our first hydrogen safety standard in 1955, and today, our safety library includes an extensive set of hydrogen-focused publications.

The standards we develop are incorporated by regulators, and used by industrial engineers, designers, and zoning bodies at the federal, state, and provincial level. We’re accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). CGA has also long worked with ISO, NFPA, and the United Nations, as well as other industrial gas associations around the world.

Rich Craig 300x300
Rich Craig Vice President, Technical and Regulatory Affairs Compressed Gas Association
  • 11 30 AM

Technoeconomic Assessment of Hydrogen Production from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Gasification in Alberta

Production

To reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) and divert municipal solid waste (MSW) from landfills, this study assessed the techno-economic feasibility of biomass and MSW gasification to produce hydro...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Production

Technoeconomic Assessment of Hydrogen Production from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Gasification in Alberta

  • pr-alarm11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

To reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) and divert municipal solid waste (MSW) from landfills, this study assessed the techno-economic feasibility of biomass and MSW gasification to produce hydrogen as a clean fuel for local transportation in Alberta. The results of biomass and MSW gasification indicated this process, coupled with carbon sequestration, can economically produce hydrogen with very low GHG emissions at costs currently below that of renewables paired with electrolysis. The calculated levelized cost of hydrogen (LCOH) from biomass gasification ranges from ~1.9 ? _3.0 $/kg for feedstock cost of 33-100 $/kg and increasing carbon price to $170 in 2030. The preliminary estimates for MSW gasification yield a LCOH of ~1.6 ?" _2.5 $/kg for MSW tipping fee of 0-77 $/kg. Hydrogen production as transportation fuel in Alberta from biomass and MSW is both technically and economically feasible. Especially for MSW, as there are gate fees to incentivize diversion of wastes from landfill as a negative value waste stream.

Behnaz Afsahi LaFrenz New 300x300
Behnaz Afsahi LaFrenz Sustainability & ESG Advisor Startide Solutions/University of Calgary
  • 11 30 AM

Introduction of Natural Gas-Hydrogen Blends for Residential End-Users

End User

This session will explore gas stratification and odorant considerations in residential customer applications as well as the appliance testing ATCO is pursuing related to hydrogen blended natural ga...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
End User

Introduction of Natural Gas-Hydrogen Blends for Residential End-Users

  • pr-alarm11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

This session will explore gas stratification and odorant considerations in residential customer applications as well as the appliance testing ATCO is pursuing related to hydrogen blended natural gas. We will also discuss the inspection program being undertaken by ATCO as part of the Fort Saskatchewan Hydrogen Blending Pilot Project.

Laura Pysyk 300x300
Laura Pysyk Senior Engineer ATCO
Kalen Jensen 300x300
Kalen Jensen Senior Engineer ATCO
  • 12 00 PM
Lunch Break & Visit Exhibition
  • 1 30 PM

Taking the Hy Road

Transportation

The climate emergency is one of the biggest challenges humanity must face in the 21st century. At the same time, the advancing global energy transition faces many challenges when it comes to ensuri...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Transportation

Taking the Hy Road

  • pr-alarm1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

The climate emergency is one of the biggest challenges humanity must face in the 21st century. At the same time, the advancing global energy transition faces many challenges when it comes to ensuring a sustainable, reliable and affordable energy supply. An emphasis on decarbonizing the existing gas infrastructure will lead to greater penetration of greener fuels, such as hydrogen, ultimately produced from renewable energy. Many operators are currently in the initial stages of investigating possibilities to build dedicated hydrogen pipelines or convert natural gas pipelines to hydrogen. Whilst industry guidance relating to (converted) hydrogen pipeline operation is increasing, code gaps remain in certain areas, including material testing requirements, material property restrictions and the applicability of established defect assessment approaches. ROSEN is actively involved in wide ranging discussions with both pipeline operators and research groups to identify the primary challenges and to develop pragmatic solutions to support operators through the hydrogen conversion process. This paper illustrates a comprehensive integrity management framework approach supporting pipeline operators with the conversion of their existing natural gas grids and operations for transporting hydrogen. This approach is founded on the extensive research that has already been completed on issues such as material susceptibility to hydrogen induced embrittlement or accelerated fatigue cracking, and the technologies that are already available to map material properties, geometry and deformation features where stress levels are elevated, and features that may be starting points for fatigue cracks. It takes us through: - Confirming system suitability and any modifications required with a desktop evaluation followed by the physical internal and external inspections and testing required to demonstrate that a particular system can safely be converted to hydrogen transport, - Identifying and addressing any gaps in knowledge regarding the impact of hydrogen on specific areas of the system. - Baseline inspections and checks needed to identify possible future changes that would be a concern. - The changes or additions to current integrity management (and potentially operating) practices needed to monitor the potential new threats. Including system monitoring, external surveys, and internal inspection in 100% hydrogen. This structured holistic framework approach will demonstrate how to start managing the introduction of hydrogen into the worlds network of gas pipelines.

Neil Gallon 300x300
Neil Gallon Principal Engineer ROSEN
  • 1 30 PM

Chemical Looping for Hydrogen Production with Co2 Capture

Carbon Capture

The team of Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and The Ohio State University (OSU) considers chemical looping as a platform technology to convert a wide range of fuels, e.g., coal, petroleum coke (petcoke), me...

Track Sponsored by : Babcock & Wilcox

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Carbon Capture

Chemical Looping for Hydrogen Production with Co2 Capture

  • pr-alarm1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9
Track Sponsored by
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The team of Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and The Ohio State University (OSU) considers chemical looping as a platform technology to convert a wide range of fuels, e.g., coal, petroleum coke (petcoke), methane, biomass, and other industrial process off-gases and materials, into multiple products including hydrogen, steam for power and heating, or synthesis gas (syngas) while inherently capturing CO2 stream, for sequestration or beneficial use, without the need for oxygen separation equipment or amine based CO2 scrubbers. These features make OSU/B&W’s chemical looping platform highly scalable and applicable to a wide array of industrial processes. Chemical looping refers to the use of metal oxide as an oxygen carrier to transfer oxygen from an oxidant, such as air or steam, to a carbon-based fuel, such as coal or natural gas. The use of the metal oxide as an intermediate oxygen carrier allows the chemical looping systems to separate the conversion of the fuel (i.e., reduction of the oxygen carrier) from the conversion of the oxidant (i.e., oxidation of the oxygen carrier). This spatial separation of the oxidants from the reductants inherently reduces the cost for downstream gas purification, making the technology platform applicable to chemical synthesis, power/steam generation with CO2 capture, and hydrogen production with CO2 capture. Though chemical looping techniques have been in development by various institutions for over a century, sustained commercial deployment of these technologies has been challenging due to limitations related to the particle and reactor performance. B&W and OSU have overcome these limitations. The fuel direct chemical looping (FDCL) process can be readily adapted to use coal, petcoke or methane, biomass, and other industrial process off-gases and materials as the fuel. In this process, the fuel reacts with the oxygen-carrier particles in the reducer reactor, forming combustion byproducts, predominantly CO2 and H2O, while reducing the iron oxide oxidation state from Fe2O3 to FeO. The reduced oxygen carrier particles (FeO) then move to the oxidizer reactor where they react with steam to partially oxidize the particles to Fe3O4 and generate a stream of hydrogen. The oxygen carrier particles are then transported to a combustor reactor where they are regenerated with air to Fe2O3. The exothermic oxidation reaction of the oxygen carrier particles with air releases heat that reheats the particles for their return to the top of the reducer reactor and can be used to produce steam for power generation or other uses. The system offers the flexibility to balance the proportion of hydrogen and steam production anywhere between near 0% and 100%.

Brian Higgins 300x300
Dr. Brian Higgins Director of Advanced Technologies Babcock & Wilcox
  • 2 00 PM

Techno-economics of a Hydrogen Value Chain Supporting Heavy Transport in Canada e

Transportation

The transition to net-zero emission energy systems requires a major effort to displace carbon-based energy carriers like gasoline, diesel, and natural gas with zero-emission energy carriers such as...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Transportation

Techno-economics of a Hydrogen Value Chain Supporting Heavy Transport in Canada e

  • pr-alarm2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

The transition to net-zero emission energy systems requires a major effort to displace carbon-based energy carriers like gasoline, diesel, and natural gas with zero-emission energy carriers such as electricity and hydrogen that are produced with little or no GHG emissions. The use of hydrogen as a fuel will require the creation of a new value chain that connects supply to demand.

In this study, we analyze different value chains for making hydrogen available to heavy-duty vehicles at fueling stations that are 5, 40 or 300 km from centralized, low-carbon hydrogen production. Three fueling station capacities were considered (0.4, 2 or 8 tH2/day) and delivery was by tube truck, liquid-hydrogen truck, or pipeline. Other fuel uses for the hydrogen along the three value chains were also considered.
To meet only the needs of heavy-duty vehicle transport, compressed hydrogen delivery by tube-trailer is the technology of choice for pilots or early demonstrations where there is low demand (<2t/day) and shorter distances separating supply and demand.

Cryogenic liquefaction of the hydrogen (LH2) adds substantially to the fuel production cost (+3 $/kg) but reduces the cost of both truck delivery and fueling station infrastructure. Therefore, LH2 is the technology of choice for larger stations (2 to 8+ t H2/day) that are further from the site of production, especially if pipeline infrastructure is not available.
To achieve retail costs for the fuel hydrogen that are competitive with current diesel prices, pipeline transport of hydrogen offers the most potential. However, to justify the infrastructure investments, an ‘economy-of-scale’ is needed that is best achieved by hydrogen pipelines following transportation corridors to serve trucks and trains while also delivering fuel hydrogen for power generation and buildings in a net-zero future.

These findings illustrate the importance of creating regional hydrogen hubs and corridors to minimize the barriers in connecting low-carbon, cost-effective supply to demand. They also highlight the importance of rapidly increasing demand for fuel hydrogen to achieve an ‘economy-of-scale’ that reduces and eventually eliminates the need for public subsidies.
It is important to note that the high cost of hydrogen compression for tube trailers, or of liquefaction for LH2 transport, undermines the economic viability for fuel to be used for power generation or for space/water heating in buildings. Given current technologies, pipelines are essential to enabling all three market opportunities and realize a scale of supply and demand that justifies the necessary infrastructure investments. Such a synergy among demand sectors delivers benefits to all and should be integrated into strategic planning for the energy transition in Canada.

Adnan Khan 300x300
Mohd Adnan Khan Energy Systems Analyst The Transition Accelerator
  • 2 00 PM

A High-Temperature Processing Lab to Enable CCU/Hydrogen Innovation

Carbon Capture

Hydrogen and carbon capture and utilization (CCU) technologies have been gaining attention as decarbonization pathways for different industry sectors. Some sectors are replacing fossil fuel with hy...

Track Sponsored by : Babcock & Wilcox

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Carbon Capture

A High-Temperature Processing Lab to Enable CCU/Hydrogen Innovation

  • pr-alarm2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9
Track Sponsored by
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Hydrogen and carbon capture and utilization (CCU) technologies have been gaining attention as decarbonization pathways for different industry sectors. Some sectors are replacing fossil fuel with hydrogen as alternative clean energy. Others try to capture and convert CO2 emitted from their process into different products as part of the circular economy. Integrated Hydrogen production and CCU technologies can be a major pathway to decarbonize the future and pave the road for a net zero-emission future. In that regard, InnoTech Alberta established a High-Temperature Processing Lab to evaluate possibilities of integration of Hydrogen production and CO2 processing to minimize the overall emission footprint and maximize the energy efficiency of the clean fuel production process. The lab is heavily focused on electrification and utilizes the most advanced concepts to deliver the required molecular level energy with minimum loss and waste. The lab is equipped with different process electro heating technologies such as plasma, microwave, direct resistance, and oven electro- heating options. This enables InnoTech to evaluate the energy performance of different available technologies as an energy delivery mechanism. One case study for discussion is the ongoing work on the evaluation of material selection and energy delivery mechanism for turquoise hydrogen pyrolysis. Methane pyrolysis is becoming one of the most attractive options for hydrogen production since it directly converts methane to hydrogen and solid carbon, and consequently, prevents emitting greenhouse gases. Suppose electricity from renewable or nuclear sources is used for the process. In that case, the produced hydrogen can play a critical role in the overall success of CO2 conversion to fuel and chemical technologies since it will improve the process's comprehensive LCA and carbon footprint. The energy intensity, as well as solid handling and separation, are the most critical aspects of methane pyrolysis. One of the novel concepts shown to deliver the desired outcomes and have the potential for scale-up is molten metal bubbling technology. InnoTech has an ongoing research program, which evaluates the compositions of metal mixtures to minimize the required energy for this specific technology. In addition, InnoTech is using various energy delivery mechanisms to assess their impact on the project's overall energy efficiency and cost. Our results indicate that molten metal bubbling technology is a viable methane pyrolysis concept that can be used for hydrogen production. It has the potential to improve both process performance and energy intensity by mixing different elements into the molten medium. Among the tested metals and metal mixtures, pure Galium showed a superior performance due to its low melting point and shorter required bed height for reaction compared to other molten metal options.

Aref Najafi 300x300
Aref Najafi Manager, Carbon Capture and Conversion InnoTech Alberta
  • 2 30 PM
Coffee Break & Visit Exhibition
  • 3 00 PM

Material Embrittlement in Hydrogen or Hydrogen-Containing Gas Blends: A Review

Transportation

Hydrogen Embrittlement in Candidate Materials for High-Pressure Hydrogen or Hydrogen-Blend Storage or Transport: A Review The safe and economic storage and transport of high-pressure hydrogen gas...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Transportation

Material Embrittlement in Hydrogen or Hydrogen-Containing Gas Blends: A Review

  • pr-alarm3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Hydrogen Embrittlement in Candidate Materials for High-Pressure Hydrogen or Hydrogen-Blend Storage or Transport: A Review The safe and economic storage and transport of high-pressure hydrogen gas in large volumes are undoubtedly set to become critical topics as hydrogen is more commonly adopted as an alternate energy carrier. Moreover, the storage and transport of hydrogen-containing gas blends (HCGBs) are equally important topics, as the use of these blends, particularly at relatively low hydrogen concentrations, likely will be a first step in the more wide-spread adoption of hydrogen. In order for these scenarios to become reality, comprehensive data on the performance in hydrogen of available materials to service pure hydrogen and HCGBs is required. While proven materials and material treatments for the storage or transport of pure hydrogen gas or high-concentration HCGBs at high pressures readily exist, these materials are not necessarily the best choice for low-concentration HCGBs due to their relatively high cost, limitations in strength and potential challenges in manufacturability and assembly. More commonly employed materials for the storage and transport of gases, such as high strength low-alloy (HSLA) carbon steels, would be an ideal choice for low-concentration HCGBs if they can be proven to be safe and reliable. In this presentation, the hydrogen embrittlement tendencies of a range of materials exposed to either high partial pressure or low partial pressure hydrogen environments are reviewed. It begins with a re-examination of the more simplified embrittlement indices, such as notch tensile strength, that have already been measured and catalogued for a wide range of materials, which in this study included regular and duplex stainless steels, low-alloy and high-alloy steels, superalloys, and non-ferrous metals. It follows with an examination of the more critical material performance parameters related to the reliability of these materials in hydrogen service, such as fracture and fatigue resistance. These properties are benchmarked for the materials known to perform reliably in hydrogen, specifically those in the austenitic stainless-steel family. It finishes with an assessment of the current knowledge on the performance of HSLA steels in low concentration hydrogen conditions, which are compared to the benchmarks previously established. This assessment is used to comment on the potential for HSLA steels to service low concentration HCGBs, as well as to identify the gaps in data that must be addressed before they can be confidently adopted. Other contributing effects, notably the impact of surface finish or defects on hydrogen absorption and embrittlement tendencies are also briefly touched on.

Mark Cuglietta 300x300
Mark Cuglietta Senior Research Engineer C-FER Technologies Inc.
  • 3 00 PM

Blue Hydrogen & Its Role in Decarbonization

Carbon Capture

Energy Transition is necessary to avoid climate changes, save the planet and, ultimately, save ourselves. Hydrogen is seen as one of the most important enablers to the energy transition as it burns...

Track Sponsored by : Babcock & Wilcox

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Carbon Capture

Blue Hydrogen & Its Role in Decarbonization

  • pr-alarm3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9
Track Sponsored by
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Energy Transition is necessary to avoid climate changes, save the planet and, ultimately, save ourselves. Hydrogen is seen as one of the most important enablers to the energy transition as it burns without producing CO2 as by-product. However hydrogen is not a source of energy, it is a vector, we don’t have wells to source it from but, instead, we need to extract it from other species, kind of natural “hydrogen tanks”: these hydrogen tanks are hydrocarbons and water. The extraction of hydrogen from hydrocarbons is nothing new for the industry: refineries, petrochemical and chemical facilities have been using hydrogen for ages as it is vital for their processes. There are many hydrogen units installed worldwide, most of them based on the Steam Reforming process. The hydrogen produced by these units is called “grey” and produces 9 to 12 tons of CO2 as by-products for each ton of produced hydrogen, CO2 that is ultimately sent to the atmosphere. So, how can we make hydrogen at scale ensuring the reduction of CO2 emissions? One solution is the Blue hydrogen: hydrogen produced from fossil origin feedstock in which the CO2 is removed and sequestrated for re-use or storage Recently there have been many press releases using blue hydrogen for new applications, however this new growth is not enough to reduce the environmental impact: a big piece of the decarbonization plan must include reducing the carbon footprint of existing facilities, and existing hydrogen units are certainly one of the most important in the industry that needs to be decarbonized. This paper summarizes the work done by Wood to evaluate, technically and economically, the decarbonization options for a base case 100,000 Nm3/h grey hydrogen unit, using pre-combustion carbon capture, post-combustion carbon capture, integration of gas heated reactors as well as combination of all these solutions.

Stephen McColl 300x300
Stephen McColl Business Development Manager Wood PLC
  • 3 30 PM

Blending Hydrogen with Natural Gas for Use in Homes

Transportation

Ever increasing concerns about climate change are driving consumers, governments, and industry to look for new solutions toward achieving net-zero emissions. Clean, renewal hydrogen is garnering c...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Transportation

Blending Hydrogen with Natural Gas for Use in Homes

  • pr-alarm3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Ever increasing concerns about climate change are driving consumers, governments, and industry to look for new solutions toward achieving net-zero emissions. Clean, renewal hydrogen is garnering considerable attention as a viable additive to natural gas to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

One of largest uses of natural gas is for space and domestic hot water heating in publicly occupied homes, apartments, and businesses. A large network of distribution systems currently exists for delivering natural gas to millions of homes. The addition of hydrogen to this infrastructure potentially facilitates the large-scale supply of a “greener” fuel to the general public, provided the hydrogen can be accurately and reliably blended with natural gas in accordance with the highest safety and composition control specifications.

Hydrogen has some very unique physical properties, such as low density, high flammability, and corrosivity which make blending hydrogen with natural gas particularly challenging. As well, flow measurement, composition analysis and environmental detection technologies used for hydrogen differ significantly from current technologies used for measuring natural gas. This presentation discusses the challenges, considerations, and technology behind blending hydrogen with natural gas for use in homes and dwellings.

A case study from the very first Hydrogen Home in North America will be used to aid in the discussion of the unique measurement and control techniques used to safely blend hydrogen with natural gas for residential use. The presentation will focus on instrumentation and control topics, including system design, mass flow measurement, closed loop analytical control technology, advanced blending control strategies (including model predictive control), safety interlocks and process control system design.

Larry Neumeister 300x300
Larry Neumeister Solutions Design Lead Spartan Controls Ltd.
  • 3 30 PM

Comparative Assessment of Blue Hydrogen from Steam Methane Reforming, Autothermal Reforming, and Natural Gas Decomposition Technologies for Natural Gas-Producing Regions

Carbon Capture

Objectives/Scope: There is limited information in the literature on the impact of plant size on production and the extent of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) on the cost and life cycle greenh...

Track Sponsored by :

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Carbon Capture

Comparative Assessment of Blue Hydrogen from Steam Methane Reforming, Autothermal Reforming, and Natural Gas Decomposition Technologies for Natural Gas-Producing Regions

  • pr-alarm3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9
Track Sponsored by
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Objectives/Scope: There is limited information in the literature on the impact of plant size on production and the extent of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) on the cost and life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of blue hydrogen production through various production pathways. Methods, Procedures, Process: In this study, we conduct a holistic comparative techno-economic and life cycle GHG emissions’ footprint assessment of three natural gas-based blue hydrogen technologies ? steam methane reforming (SMR), autothermal reforming (ATR), and natural gas decomposition (NGD). Six hundred tonnes per day (607 T/d) of hydrogen production was considered. To understand the impact of carbon capture on the SMR process, capturing process emissions (SMR-52%) and process and flue gas emissions (SMR-85%) were considered. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were conducted to assess the impact of economic parameters on hydrogen cost. A scale factor was developed for each technology to understand the hydrogen production cost with a change in production plant size. Results, Observations, Conclusions: Using discounted cash flow method, hydrogen cost was estimated to be 1.22, 1.23, 2.12, 1.69, 2.26, 1.66, and 2.55 $/kg H2 for SMR, ATR, NGD, SMR-52%, SMR-85%, ATR-CCS, and NGD-CCS, respectively. The results indicate that when uncertainty is considered, SMR-52% and ATR-CCS are economically preferable to NGD-CCS and SMR-85%. SMR-52% could outperform ATR-CCS when the natural gas price decreases and the rate of return increases. SMR-85% is the least attractive pathway; however, it could outperform NGD-CCS economically when CO2 transportation cost and natural gas price decrease. Hydrogen storage cost significantly impacts the hydrogen production cost. SMR-52%, SMR-85%, ATR-CCS, and NGD-CCS have scale factors of 0.67, 0.68, 0.54, and 0.65, respectively. The hydrogen cost variation with capacity shows that operating SMR-52% and ATR-CCS above hydrogen capacity of 200 tonnes/day is economically attractive. Blue hydrogen from autothermal reforming has the lowest life cycle GHG emissions of 3.91 kgCO2eq/kg H2, followed by blue hydrogen from NGD-CCS (4.54 kgCO2eq/kg H2), SMR-85% (6.66 kgCO2eq/kg H2), and SMR-52% (8.20 kgCO2eq/kg H2). Novel/Additive Information: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comparative assessment that examines the economic and GHG impacts of SMR-CCS, ATR-CCS, and NGD-CCS technologies. The findings of this study are useful for decision-making at various levels.

Abayomi Oni 300x300
Abayomi Oni Research Associate University of Alberta
  • 4 00 PM

Is There Value for Low Carbon Hydrogen Exports from Alberta, Canada in International Markets?

Transportation

Objectives/Scope: The study objective is to assess the delivered cost of gaseous hydrogen exported from Canada (a fossil-resource rich country) to the Asia-Pacific, Europe, and inland destinations...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Transportation

Is There Value for Low Carbon Hydrogen Exports from Alberta, Canada in International Markets?

  • pr-alarm4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Objectives/Scope: The study objective is to assess the delivered cost of gaseous hydrogen exported from Canada (a fossil-resource rich country) to the Asia-Pacific, Europe, and inland destinations in North America. There needs to be an opportunity for energy-exporting countries to provide energy-importing countries with a secure source and supply of low-carbon hydrogen to sustain the growing global hydrogen demand. Methods, Procedures, Process: We applied fundamental engineering-based models to assess the cost of delivering gaseous hydrogen from Alberta to Eastern Canada (Quebec and Ontario), California (USA), three Asia-Pacific countries (Japan, South Korea, and China), and two European countries (Germany and the United Kingdom). Techno-economic analysis methods were used to determine the delivered cost of hydrogen to these destinations. The analysis considered the energy, material, and capacity-sizing requirements of five supply chain stages comprising low-carbon hydrogen production from steam methane reforming integrated with carbon capture and storage (SMR-CCS), long-distance inland hydrogen pipeline, hydrogen liquefaction, shipping, and regasification at the import destinations. Three export terminals in British Columbia were considered for gaseous hydrogen liquefaction and shipping to overseas destinations. We also assessed other potential options for cost reduction, such as blending hydrogen into existing natural gas pipelines for long-distance inland destinations and using ammonia rather than gaseous hydrogen as the primary carrier to overseas destinations. Results, Observations, Conclusions: We found that the cost of delivering low-carbon hydrogen to the inland destinations in North America is between C$4.81/kg H2 and C$6.03/kg H2, to the Asia-Pacific from C$6.65/kg H2 to C$6.99/kg H2, and at least C$8.14/kg H2 for exports to Europe. Eliminating the need for liquefaction at the export terminal by using ammonia as the hydrogen carrier leads to cost savings of about 27.9% in the total overseas delivered cost of hydrogen. Also, blending hydrogen in existing long-distance natural gas pipelines to Ontario and California lowered the delivered cost by 25% and 16.7%, respectively. Low-carbon hydrogen delivery from Alberta offers an immediate low-cost supply option of hydrogen against domestic production options for Japan and South Korea but is not cost-competitive with current domestic production options in Europe and China. A summary of the results indicates that leveraging the existing export supply chain for ammonia commodity trade, especially to Japan, can create an economic prospect for Alberta in the near term. Novel/Additive Information: To the best of our knowledge, this analysis is the first to address the data gap on the feasibility of large-scale inter-continental export of hydrogen from an energy-producing jurisdiction to energy-consuming jurisdictions. The developed insight will assist policymakers and the industry about how Canada may successfully participate and encourage the relevant industry players to be involved in the international trade of low-carbon hydrogen.

Ayodeji Okunlola 300x300
Ayodeji Okunlola PhD Candidate University of Alberta
  • 4 00 PM

More Effective Carbon Capture for Blue Hydrogen Production

Carbon Capture

Reforming natural gas is the most economical way of producing hydrogen. Blue hydrogen integrates carbon capture into the hydrogen plant to produce hydrogen with minimal carbon emissions. Commerci...

Track Sponsored by: : Babcock & Wilcox

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
tuesday April 26, 2022
Carbon Capture

More Effective Carbon Capture for Blue Hydrogen Production

  • pr-alarm4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9
Track Sponsored by:
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Reforming natural gas is the most economical way of producing hydrogen. Blue hydrogen integrates carbon capture into the hydrogen plant to produce hydrogen with minimal carbon emissions. Commercial options for carbon capture technologies from hydrogen plants will be discussed, including specific examples developed for both pre- and post-combustion carbon capture solutions. The latest auto-thermal reforming (ATR) hydrogen generation technology can benefit from a novel approach to carbon capture that saves significant energy costs and utilities compared to recent benchmark projects. The presentation will leverage information from Fluor's extensive experience in operating carbon capture facilities, including Fluor Solvent pre-combustion capture technology, and Fluor's Econamine FG+TM post-combustion capture technology.

Matthew Gutscher 300x300
Matthew Gutscher Principal Process Engineer Fluor Canada
  • 4 30 PM
Day One of Technical Courses Concludes for the Day
  • 8 00 AM
Registration Opens
  • 9 00 AM

Made In Canada: How to Extrapolate Australian and Northern European Experience to the Canadian Market

Production

Hydrogen is happening in Canada. The Hydrogen Strategy for Canada was released in 2020 and regional and provincial strategies are following behind. The challenge is not in the ambition, but in the...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Production

Made In Canada: How to Extrapolate Australian and Northern European Experience to the Canadian Market

  • pr-alarm9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Hydrogen is happening in Canada. The Hydrogen Strategy for Canada was released in 2020 and regional and provincial strategies are following behind. The challenge is not in the ambition, but in the implementation and the timeline. How do we get from hydrogen on the horizon to hydrogen in our homes, businesses, and transport system? Some other countries have more defined policy and are further along with strategies to support their emerging hydrogen economies including demand, supply, and technology development. How can we use the conclusions drawn, lessons learned, and strategies developed in other parts of the world to help our emerging hydrogen economy? And how do we need to do things differently? Two case studies will be presented: 1. Integrated Report on the Role of Hydrogen in Norway DNV mapped the role that it is realistic to assume that hydrogen can play in Norway as part of a transition to a low carbon future towards 2030, and to provide an objective, neutral and up- to-date description of the market and technology status for hydrogen including limitations for hydrogen as a low and zero emission energy carrier in Norway from a value chain perspective. A National Plan for 2. Decarbonizing Gas Networks in Australia DNV supported Energy Networks Australia’s (ENA) demonstration on how it will enable the blending of renewable and decarbonised gases into its networks by 2030, and de-risk conversion of the networks to 100% renewable and decarbonized gas by 2050.

Melissa Morrison 300x300
Melissa Morrison Team Lead, Environmental Permitting Service and Canadian Hydrogen Planning DNV
  • 9 00 AM

Hydrogen Fuels for High Value Gas Turbine Energy Applications

End User

There is an important potential in Canada to develop a diverse and reliable clean energy economy, based on a variety of low carbon systems. Although hydrogen will be an expensive fuel, there are s...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
wednesday April 27, 2022
End User

Hydrogen Fuels for High Value Gas Turbine Energy Applications

  • pr-alarm9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

There is an important potential in Canada to develop a diverse and reliable clean energy economy, based on a variety of low carbon systems. Although hydrogen will be an expensive fuel, there are several high value applications of hydrogen that will be needed over the coming decades, complementing most types of renewable energy, storage and efficient natural gas systems for industries and cities. A major part of this clean portfolio will include innovative hybrid and flexible industrial gas turbine systems. These have already provided a diverse range of solutions, using a combination of fuels and high pressure airflow, that provide reliable power and efficient thermal energy. High value applications of hydrogen-based fuels and gas turbine energy applications will involve systems that demonstrate a low carbon footprint, flexible integration with renewable energy and storage, reliability and resilience, as well as energy efficiency. Peak and standby power generation, industrial processes and cogeneration, commercial district energy, advanced cycles, and integration with public transit are some of those opportunities. New public policy, regulatory initiatives, safety standards and workforce capacity will be important considerations in developing a comprehensive set of solutions. This paper and presentation will summarize previous applications of gas turbine energy systems, and highlight new approaches to take advantage of hydrogen-based energy opportunities, including; - examples of industrial gas turbine systems in Canadian power, cogeneration and pipeline applications in Western Canada - review of international research and testing for hydrogen combustion in new gas turbine systems - the potential for resilient H2 energy to deal with extreme conditions, with low GHG and air pollutant solutions, integrated with complementary systems (renewables, storage, fuel cells, etc) - public policy, business and regulatory considerations to advance these objectives - developing ISO standards for industrial hydrogen systems - examples of industry outreach and training opportunities.

Manfred Klein 300x300
Manfred Klein Energy Consultant MA Klein and Assoc.
  • 9 30 AM

The Feasibility of Hydrogen Pipeline Design and Repurposing in Canada

Production

The drive for energy transition is currently underway, with many projects looking to convert or develop new facilities for integration into existing infrastructure. Canada is proceeding to develop...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Production

The Feasibility of Hydrogen Pipeline Design and Repurposing in Canada

  • pr-alarm9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

The drive for energy transition is currently underway, with many projects looking to convert or develop new facilities for integration into existing infrastructure. Canada is proceeding to develop the regulatory framework to support this transition. CSA Z662 has proposed a different approach to ASME B31.12. CSA Z662 is expected, based on details presented in the recent public review, to provide an open ended assessment process to complete any repurposing whereas ASME B31.12 provides prescriptive approaches that can be used to confirm system suitability. This paper presents a roadmap to repurposing and the potential blockers with respect to current code compliance based on inhouse study of international code requirements and recent repurposing study work with particular focus on North American requirements. Case studies will be presented looking at the different approaches and how the requirements can be achieved for conversions of NG to H2. Other options for the conversion, such as reduction in Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure (MAOP) as per ASME B31.12 will also be explored. Based on rudimental calculations, comparing both energy NG and H2 carriers, repurposed pipelines can be capable of achieving circa 70-80% of the energy flow rate if MAOP can be maintained, or 50-60% if the MAOP is de-rated. If other operational restrictions are considered, such as flow velocity it can potentially have additional knock-on effect on the achievable flowrate and consequently to energy ratio.

Jim (Wood PLC) 300x300
Jim Steeves Senior Manager, Pipelines Wood PLC
  • 9 30 AM

What Does the Increase in Demand mean for the Progression of Fuel Cell Technology?

End User

Almost every country worldwide is talking about electrification, and markets in Europe are quickly taking to powering a variety of vehicles with hydrogen fuel cell technology. The increase in deman...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
wednesday April 27, 2022
End User

What Does the Increase in Demand mean for the Progression of Fuel Cell Technology?

  • pr-alarm9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

Almost every country worldwide is talking about electrification, and markets in Europe are quickly taking to powering a variety of vehicles with hydrogen fuel cell technology. The increase in demand not only means the industry must ramp its efforts to scale supply, but it also paves the way for added incentives bringing welcome investment, infrastructure and technology development. Ultimately, this benefits consumers who will begin to see improved accessibility and affordability of hydrogen and fuel cell technology. Loop Energy President & CEO, Ben Nyland will explore how Loop Energy views this growth in demand and why this is an opportunity to produce better performing and cost-effective hydrogen fuel cells for commercial vehicles.

Ben Nyland 300x300
Ben Nyland President & CEO Loop Energy
  • 10 00 AM
Coffee Break & Visit Exhibition
  • 10 30 AM

Greenhouse Gas Intensity and Share of Low-carbon Technology Vehicles in 2050

End User

Objectives/Scope: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the greenhouse gas mitigation potential in scenarios where conventional vehicles transition to low carbon vehicles (battery electric and h...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
wednesday April 27, 2022
End User

Greenhouse Gas Intensity and Share of Low-carbon Technology Vehicles in 2050

  • pr-alarm10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

Objectives/Scope: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the greenhouse gas mitigation potential in scenarios where conventional vehicles transition to low carbon vehicles (battery electric and hydrogen fuel cell). Factors such as refuelling infrastructure and vehicle and energy costs of low carbon vehicles play an important role and can impact the time required for this transition. Methods, Procedures, Process: The passenger and freight road transportation sector of Alberta was modelled using a bottom-up approach in Low Emissions Analysis Platform (LEAP). A system-wide analysis to include the upstream emissions associated with the supply chains of fuels was done. Adoption of low carbon technology vehicles including battery electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles was considered based on capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, carbon price and other macro-economic factors. The cost of ownership and market share for all categories of the road transportation sector has been projected up to 2050. Several scenarios were analyzed to explore the extent of the adoption of low-carbon technology vehicles resulting from varying the carbon price. The system-wide greenhouse gas emissions and GHG intensity for each scenario were calculated and compared. Results, Observations, Conclusions: The results show that battery electric vehicles will have the highest share in the fleet by 2050. The higher costs of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles will slacken its share as compared to battery electric vehicles in all the categories of the road transportation sector. The emission factor for battery electric vehicles is initially higher than hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles but becomes the lowest by 2030 in $50/tonne and by 2040 in $170/tonne and $350/tonne carbon price scenarios. Emission factor for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles are comparably higher with being lowest in case where hydrogen is produced using auto-thermal reforming. These are found to be comparable with battery electric vehicles emission factor. The potential for minimizing greenhouse gas emissions was found to be 16.5% and 12.5% for passenger and freight sectors. The maximum potential was calculated with high sensitivity to cost scenarios where the potential was found to be 41.9% and 36.5% for passenger and freight sectors. Novel/Additive Information: To the best of our knowledge, it is the first study that considers hydrogen production by auto-thermal reforming with carbon capture in a long-term greenhouse gas emissions analysis. We analysed the potential of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles for all the categories of the road transportation sector and calculated the sector-wide greenhouse gas emissions. The results indicates the potential of these vehicles and provide insights for policymakers to transition to low-carbon technology vehicles.

Minza Haider 300x300
Minza Haider Graduate Student University of Alberta
  • 10 30 AM

Novel SnMR Hydrogen Production from Ethane, NGLs and Ethanol Feedstocks

Production

Novel Steam Non-Methane Reformation of ethane, NGLs, and ethanol feedstock for the production of low-cost, low-carbon intensity hydrogen. Modular systems for reforming midstream ethane/NGLs and et...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Production

Novel SnMR Hydrogen Production from Ethane, NGLs and Ethanol Feedstocks

  • pr-alarm10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Novel Steam Non-Methane Reformation of ethane, NGLs, and ethanol feedstock for the production of low-cost, low-carbon intensity hydrogen. Modular systems for reforming midstream ethane/NGLs and ethanol at regional process plants allow for production flexibility for transportation H2, direct H2 pipeline injection, and H2 gas to power applications. Known technologies like amine systems, PSAs, and SNG reactors are leveraged with patented and digitally controlled heavy hydrocarbon reformers (HHRs) to produce low-cost hydrogen from abundant low-cost feedstocks in a distributed H2 production format.

Larry Tree 300x300
Larry Tree President & CEO Proteum Energy, LLC
  • 11 00 AM

Overcoming Measurement Challenges in Hydrogen

Production

The urgency of reaching net-zero emissions has never been greater. As Canada transitions towards a clean energy future, hydrogen can be safely blended into the natural gas supply to help reduce ove...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm11:00 AM - 11:30 AM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Production

Overcoming Measurement Challenges in Hydrogen

  • pr-alarm11:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

The urgency of reaching net-zero emissions has never been greater. As Canada transitions towards a clean energy future, hydrogen can be safely blended into the natural gas supply to help reduce overall GHG emissions. Pipelines are now looking to blend 5-20% of Hydrogen into natural gas systems. Hydrogen presents several challenges when it comes to instrumentation and measurement. Instrument devices like pressure transmitters and flow meters need unique material considerations, different analytical techniques are required to provide accurate purity measurements, and different BTU analysis techniques are required for hydrogen and natural gas blends. These challenges manifest differently at various stages of production of hydrogen and its various downstream uses. Quantification and measurement of Hydrogen during production is paramount. Depending on the production method the measurement of Hydrogen requires the ability to deal with wet, and sometimes hot gases. Hydrogen that is purified and sold to market requires may require quantification of trace impurities, such as ensuring it meets purity requirements for fuel cell use. Standard metering technologies in natural gas systems need to change to accommodate the introduction of Hydrogen. Accurate control of the blending process is required to provide the precision necessary for custody transfer. This presentation will cover a number of new measurement solutions across a variety of Hydrogen applications.

Don Ford 300x300
Don Ford Technical Specialist Spartan Controls Ltd.
  • 11 00 AM

De-risking Hydrogen Investments – A Role for Many

End User

It is established now that hydrogen can play a significant role in progressing the world to net-zero objectives. It is no longer a question of why hydrogen, but more around how and when hydrogen. P...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm11:00 AM - 11:30 AM
wednesday April 27, 2022
End User

De-risking Hydrogen Investments – A Role for Many

  • pr-alarm11:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

It is established now that hydrogen can play a significant role in progressing the world to net-zero objectives. It is no longer a question of why hydrogen, but more around how and when hydrogen. Participants across the energy value chain see new opportunities but also barriers for investment in hydrogen economy. It is natural to look towards governments to develop policies that de-risk these investments. But it is not just the role of the policymakers. The participants across the value chain have ‘skin in the game’ and hence a role to de-risk.

Investors exploring hydrogen investments are interested in factors such as – technology maturity; project complexity; facilitating policies; offtake arrangements and market attractiveness. This presentation will provide an overview of the key risks/barriers holding back the much-needed investments. First, the expected interventions of the governments. Then, look at how key participants like – technology providers, operators, industrial users and investors can mitigate the investment risks.

The policy interventions could be in various forms, including - carbon price; programs for hydrogen infrastructure; private & public sector collaboration on R&D; and sector specific programs. In the near-term, all forms of low carbon hydrogen production options need to be included in the policies.

Participants across the value chain, can contribute to mitigating the investment risks.

• Economic and technical regulators can enable regulations for infrastructure investment for transportation.
• Technology provider can improve performance through R&D investments
• Project developer/operator can assume development/operating risk through an operating model integrating upstream, midstream and downstream processes.
• Financial institutions can design innovative financial instruments
• Industrial off-takers can decarbonize their operations through long term contracts.
• Participants can share the risk through minority stake and/or co-investment

The investment attractiveness and de-risking approaches will vary by the regional emission reduction objectives, by the complexity of the project and by the segment of the value chain under consideration. Investment progress could be very different – investments could flow first to projects aimed at replacing current ‘fossil fuel’ based hydrogen; followed by industrial off-takers substituting fuels with hydrogen; and then could be to storage and transportation infrastructure. There will be some challenges encountered along the way, but the sector needs to monitor, evaluate and adapt.

Net zero targets will only take to a certain point of progress. Decisive actions are required by all stakeholders involved to de-risk investments and grow the hydrogen economy, with policymakers in the lead.

Sagar Kancharla 300x300
Sagar Kancharla Director - Energy Transition Advisory & Investments WSP Canada
  • 11 30 AM

Clean Hydrogen Production by the TCD Technology

Production

Hycamite TCD Technologies (Thermo-Catalytic-Decomposition) produces clean hydrogen (H₂) and value-added, solid carbon by splitting methane (CH₄), the main component of natural gas and biogas. Our i...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Production

Clean Hydrogen Production by the TCD Technology

  • pr-alarm11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Hycamite TCD Technologies (Thermo-Catalytic-Decomposition) produces clean hydrogen (H₂) and value-added, solid carbon by splitting methane (CH₄), the main component of natural gas and biogas. Our innovation is within the catalyst design which enables our reactor to split methane with less energy and zero CO2 emissions. Based on this approach of low energy in, value-added carbon output, we can provide hydrogen at an affordable price for industrial purposes. Hycamite’s TCD Process is scalable and robust, so production meets a range of demanding industrial requirements. The catalyst design is our core innovation and Intellectual Property (IP). The technology is based on long-term, applied chemistry research from the University of Oulu. It is environmentally friendly in that the catalyst is recycled sustainably. This technology enables companies to switch fuels to hydrogen and take advantage of existing natural gas distribution networks that are already in place. It also enables companies to make the switch without the gridlock of insufficient clean, affordable hydrogen on the market. Hydrogen can be used as feedstock for the chemical industry, climate-neutral fuel production, or as an emission-free fuel to balance fluctuations in the electricity generated by wind and solar power. The two products ? hydrogen and solid, value-added carbon ?" benefit from each other in terms of lower costs. A range of carbon products is ideal for battery manufacturing, new materials and other industrial uses. These industries are critical for the future of North America and Europe. Carbon products are now imported from Asia ?" we produce them locally, and we produce them cleanly and sustainably. These value-added carbon products include carbon nanotubes (CNT), carbon nanofibers (CNF) and graphite amongst others. Our business model is based on the direct sales of our main end products; value-added carbon and clean, turquoise hydrogen. The TCD facilities can easily and scalably be located close to the hydrogen customers to avoid unnecessary investments into infrastructure. Long-term supply agreements will give security to asset investors financing the plants. The sale of carbon, combined with carbon emissions trading will further enhance the financial viability. The TCD facilities will operate under Hycamite supervision to ensure operational efficiency and optimization. This way the business model can be truly scalable to enable quick internationalization and take advantage of economies of scale. On-site production ensures the reliability of delivery. The privately-held company Hycamite is preparing to begin construction of an industrial pilot plant in the Kokkola Industrial Park (KIP) in Finland next year.

Niina Gronqvist 300x300
Niina Grönqvist Commercial Director Hycamite TCD Technologies Ltd
  • 11 30 AM

The Role of Hydrogen in a Deeply Decarbonized Electricity System

End User

I propose to discuss how a deeply decarbonized power market will differ from the system we have today and the potential role of blue and green hydrogen in such a system. Much of my presentation wi...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
End User

The Role of Hydrogen in a Deeply Decarbonized Electricity System

  • pr-alarm11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

I propose to discuss how a deeply decarbonized power market will differ from the system we have today and the potential role of blue and green hydrogen in such a system. Much of my presentation will be based on research from the Roosevelt Project, an effort within the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology “to provide an analytical basis for charting a path to a low carbon economy in a way that promotes high quality job growth, minimizes worker and community dislocation, and harnesses the benefits of energy technologies for regional economic development.” To be clear, I am making my own argument on the role of hydrogen and using the research materials to support my case. Providing reliability to a deeply decarbonized power system is difficult and costly, but the cost of unreliability is far greater, as witnessed in Texas with the natural gas well freeze offs of early 2021. I will share some work that shows how the loss of reliable base load generation affected the system and the implications for future markets. Hydrogen is not the only alternative. Natural gas, small nuclear and electricity storage can also provide reliability to power markets. I will share recent research on these sources and how they compare with blue and green hydrogen.

Greg Zwick 300x300
Greg Zwick Principal Zwick Analytics
  • 12 00 PM
Lunch Break & Visit Exhibition
  • 1 30 PM

Operating Canada’s First Hydrogen Fueling Station Network

Transportation

Scope: HTEC has been developing and operating a network of stations since June 2018 in the Metro Vancouver region, in partnership with vehicle manufacturers, retail stations owners, provincial and...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Transportation

Operating Canada’s First Hydrogen Fueling Station Network

  • pr-alarm1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Scope: HTEC has been developing and operating a network of stations since June 2018 in the Metro Vancouver region, in partnership with vehicle manufacturers, retail stations owners, provincial and federal government agencies. During this time, HTEC has learned much about the integration of equipment and dispensers into existing stations, fuel supply and delivery approaches, and station operation. HTEC proposes to provide a snapshot of the current network, delivery approaches and the associated advantages and disadvantages. Challenges in the field will also be presented. Methods, procedures, process: HTEC will provide insights into what it takes to be operating Canada’s First Hydrogen Fueling Station Network. The presentation will demonstrate how HTEC works with its partners and suppliers to provide fueling solutions that take into considerations consumer experience, site constraints and fuel delivery options. HTEC monitors key performance indicators that are used to adjust operating procedures and guide equipment selection. The company also had to learn to operate in particularly hot, cold and wet operating environments throughout 2021, allowing for further understanding and adaptation. For fuel supply and distribution, HTEC evaluated and experimented with different approaches ?" each of which hold advantages and disadvantages. These learnings and consequent solutions will be discussed in HTEC’s presentation. Finally, operating and growing this network comes with several challenges such as extreme weather, predicting growing customer usage, educating customers about new fueling nozzles and different interfaces, to name a few. The presentation will delve on the various solutions adopted by HTEC ranging from installation to maintenance to storage resolutions to reviewing interfaces. Results, observations, conclusions: While building hydrogen capacity and growing the fueling station network is not devoid of challenges, HTEC has carefully assessed and formulated various solutions to address these. HTEC’s presentation will provide insights into how we are effectively supporting a sustainable transportation future. Novel/additive information: The presentation will showcase how HTEC is the ‘glue’ of the clean hydrogen value chain, integrating technologies, systems, people, and partnerships, for hydrogen’s role in our zero-emission future. Using on-ground experience and learnings, HTEC will discuss novel approaches and solutions that can help the industry collectively grow and compete on a global scale.

Colin Armstrong.jpg
Colin Armstrong President and CEO HTEC
  • 1 30 PM

Lowering the Cost of Green Hydrogen

Production

ALBERTAH2 CORPORATION (AH2) has developed a patent-pending system for generating hydrogen (H2) that does not require high purity water for operation. The process was designed to enhance and supplem...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Production

Lowering the Cost of Green Hydrogen

  • pr-alarm1:30 PM - 2:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

ALBERTAH2 CORPORATION (AH2) has developed a patent-pending system for generating hydrogen (H2) that does not require high purity water for operation. The process was designed to enhance and supplement existing oil and gas assets in Western Canada and will be of primary interest to producers interested in reducing their carbon emission intensity (CI). The key component of this modular system is the Produced Water Electrolyzer (PWE), which employs a unique two-step method to avoid the issues associated with oxygen (O2) generation at the anode of other electrolyzers. The PWE employs a simple, bipolar design for H2 generation in the electrolyser cell, followed by a downstream reactor for O2 generation. Resistance to the effects of both sour and hard water components have been addressed by this unique two step design. Appropriately configured, component change-out is readily and efficiently carried out on-line. Target hydrogen costs are expected to fall between those of Blue and (currently) Conventional Green Hydrogen. This technology will act as a “battery” for solar and wind installations and, as such, there has been strong support for this technology from renewable energy developers for both stand-alone and grid-based installations.

John Sutherland 300x300
John Sutherland CEO ALBERTAH2 CORPORATION
  • 2 00 PM

Linde Separation Technology Enables Existing Pipeline Infrastructure for H2 Distribution

Transportation

As one of the world’s leading industrial gases and engineering companies, Linde covers the full spectrum of the hydrogen value chain and has many decades of expertise in producing, processing, stor...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Transportation

Linde Separation Technology Enables Existing Pipeline Infrastructure for H2 Distribution

  • pr-alarm2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

As one of the world’s leading industrial gases and engineering companies, Linde covers the full spectrum of the hydrogen value chain and has many decades of expertise in producing, processing, storing, and distributing hydrogen. Hydrogen has been one of Linde’s fastest growing molecules for the past 10 years. Today Linde generates approximately US$ 2.2 billion per year of global revenue through hydrogen. Linde has a long history as a leading industrial gas supplier in Canada and we are uniquely positioned to leverage our local capabilities and our global expertise to help customers and industry stakeholders navigate through the complexities of the transition to a zero-carbon economy. One important problem to address is developing the infrastructure required to make hydrogen widely available. A dedicated H2 pipeline network would be ideal for broad distribution ? similar to the way that natural gas is distributed across networks of pipelines today. But the costs are prohibitive to build a network of H2 pipelines from scratch. One near term solution is to inject and co-mingle H2 into existing natural gas pipeline networks. There are projects already underway in Canada and elsewhere around the world to demonstrate the technical viability for hydrogen to displace natural gas displacement up to 20% or 30%. But there are some customers ?" for example in mobility ?" that will require very high purity hydrogen for use in their applications. This presentation will describe the unique combination of membrane and pressure swing adsorption technologies Linde has developed to capture low concentrations of hydrogen in natural gas pipelines and efficiently make a hydrogen product at 90% or even >99.99% purity at the point of consumption. Linde has started up the world’s first full-scale pilot plant in Dormagen to showcase this technology. This effort, complemented by the build-out of new hydrogen distribution infrastructure over time, could provide an innovative answer to the need for broad, high-volume pipeline distribution for users requiring a wide range of H2 quality for their applications.

Nick Perkins 300x300
Nick Perkins Business Development Manager – Membrane and Adsorption Plants Linde Engineering Americas
  • 2 00 PM

Current State of the Electrolyzer Market and Electrolyzer Models

Production

Green hydrogen is one of the technologies with highest expectations to support clean power generation in the path to net zero. To scale this technology to the level needed for the desired impact, g...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Production

Current State of the Electrolyzer Market and Electrolyzer Models

  • pr-alarm2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

Green hydrogen is one of the technologies with highest expectations to support clean power generation in the path to net zero. To scale this technology to the level needed for the desired impact, green hydrogen needs to grow at a rapid pace. Elements such as production cost, technology maturity, reliability, and others make green hydrogen more expensive than its blue or gray counterparts. One of the key elements for the green hydrogen economy is electrolyzer technology. Many questions are posed regarding manufacturers, types of electrolyzers, efficiencies, reliability, risk, and maturity. DNV conducted a review of 20 of the top electrolyzer manufacturers worldwide to assess and compare currently available electrolyzer technologies and models. To establish a common ground for comparison, an analysis was done to identify the common characteristics of commercially available, and select pre-commercial, electrolyzer models. Information collected included power rating, minimum load, stack and system power consumption, production capacity, and water usage. Of the models reviewed, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) electrolyzers are slightly more common than alkaline electrolyzers. Anion Exchange Membrane (AEM) and Solid Oxide electrolyzers are rare and are still in the pre-commercial stage for a couple of manufacturers. Both PEM and alkaline electrolyzer models are commercially available up to the 20 MW range, which can then be combined to form large projects in the 100+ MW range. Pressurized alkaline electrolyzers have become more common in the market and operating pressures are now converging on those of the PEM electrolyzers reviewed. The stack power consumption of models available in the market is generally equivalent between PEM and alkaline at approximately 50 kWh/kg; however, the system power consumption varies, especially for electrolyzers with smaller capacity/lower power rating where it tends to be much higher in comparison to the stack power consumption than for larger capacity electrolyzers. DNV proposes to present the results of the review conducted to provide an overview of the current state of the electrolyzer market and electrolyzer models available, including the variations in power consumption, operating pressure, production capacity, minimum load, and water usage by technology type.

Jillian Johnson 300x300
Jillian Johnson Senior Engineer DNV
  • 2 30 PM
Coffee Break & Visit Exhibition
  • 3 00 PM

Comparative Cost and Greenhouse Gas Emission Assessment of Land-based Hydrogen Transportation Systems

Transportation

Objectives/Scope: Interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is growing as countries look to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in hard-to-abate sectors. Current research into hydrogen has focuse...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Transportation

Comparative Cost and Greenhouse Gas Emission Assessment of Land-based Hydrogen Transportation Systems

  • pr-alarm3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Objectives/Scope: Interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is growing as countries look to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in hard-to-abate sectors. Current research into hydrogen has focused on production and well-to-wheel analysis of fuel cell vehicles. Research on Hydrogen transportation has either focused on vehicle refueling stations, or approximate hydrogen as natural gas to estimate pipeline emissions. In this work. Hydrogen transportation emissions and costs are relevant to natural gas rich regions who are looking to export hydrogen. This work performs an Alberta based techno-economic analysis on long-distance high-capacity hydrogen transportation systems. In this work, we assess and compare the unit costs and emission footprints (direct and indirect) of 32 systems for hydrogen transportation. Pathways include pure hydrogen, hythane (natural gas hydrogen blend), ammonia, and liquid organic hydrogen carrier. Pipeline, truck, and rail systems are assessed for the relevant fluids. Methods, Procedures, Process: Process-based models were used to examine the transportation of pure hydrogen (hydrogen pipeline and truck transport of gaseous and liquified hydrogen), hydrogen-natural gas blends (pipeline), ammonia (pipeline), and liquid organic hydrogen carriers (pipeline and rail). Alberta specific inputs are used as a case study, but the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis examine a range of input values that are relevant to other areas. Analysis was performed for distances between 1,000 to 3,000 km and a capacity of 607 tH2/d. Models previously developed for crude oil and natural gas pipelines are adapted for the various fluids assessed. Our results are used to create correlations for costs and emissions as a function of distance so that others can use this work for their specific scenarios. Results, Observations, Conclusions: At 1,000 km, the pure hydrogen pipelines are the best option with a levelized cost of $0.66/kg H2 and a GHG footprint of 595 gCO2eq/kg H2. At 1,000 km, ammonia, liquid organic hydrogen carrier, and truck transport scenarios were more than twice as expensive as pure hydrogen pipeline and hythane, and more than 1.5 times as expensive at 3,000 km. The GHG emission footprints of pure hydrogen pipeline transport and ammonia transport are comparable, whereas all other transport systems are more than twice as high. These results may be informative for governments agencies, internationally, developing policy around clean hydrogen. Novel/Additive Information: This work uses process modeling to get a detailed breakdown of costs and emissions for multiple transportation pathways rather than using high level estimates. Our work was able to ensure all pathways are modeled using the same regional data and model boundaries for a consistent comparison.

Giovanni Di Lullo 300x300
Giovanni Di Lullo PhD Candidate University of Alberta
  • 3 00 PM

Synthetic Fuels through High Temperature Electrolysis and Nuclear/Renewable Energy

Production

Canada has been a world leader in alkaline and PEM electrolyser technologies for low volume hydrogen production over several decades. With the advancements in high-volume manufacturing capacity and...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Production

Synthetic Fuels through High Temperature Electrolysis and Nuclear/Renewable Energy

  • pr-alarm3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

Canada has been a world leader in alkaline and PEM electrolyser technologies for low volume hydrogen production over several decades. With the advancements in high-volume manufacturing capacity and decreasing cost of electrical power from renewable sources, these technologies are experiencing renewed interest for large scale hydrogen production. In parallel, globally, other advanced technologies requiring significantly lower power consumption due to thermodynamic benefits of high temperature operation have been under development. Luckily, Canada has been in the forefront in some of these developments as well ? namely the moderate temperature Copper-Chlorine (Cu-Cl) hybrid thermochemical cycle (~530°C maximum temperature requirement) and the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE), operated at about 750°C. Canadian Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario has built and operated successfully a laboratory-scale Cu-Cl unit. Versa Power in Alberta is a leading manufacturer of HTSE systems. At the current status of technological development of the HTSE technology, it can be conveniently integrated with concentrated solar power (CSP) and/or nuclear energy because of the availability of thermal as well as electrical energy from these sources. Use of hydrogen produced from HTSE using a clean source of power, instead of hydrogen from a Steam Methane Reformer, provides an opportunity to reduce the carbon intensity of many processes, including synthetic fuel production, towards meeting Governments’ Net Zero Emission target. An application of HTSE technology is proposed for a Feasibility and Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the production of synthetic fuels from biomass in collaboration with Expander. In this proposal, not only the hydrogen, but also the oxygen is made effective use to render the whole process economical with significantly reduced carbon intensity, for synthetic diesel production as drop-in fuel for heavy duty transport sector. The concept is amenable for a wide range of scale of production of synthetic diesel depending on the availability of biomass and the type of energy source. Also a modular concept for the integration of the different technologies will be employed so that the plant can be part of a hub with hydrogen production as the main binding technology. A derivative of the HTSE technology, namely High Temperature CO2 co-Electrolysis (HTCE) is advancing rapidly around the world to capture and utilize CO2 in emissions from various sources to produce syngas. The H2 to CO ratio in the syngas can be easily tailored to the requirements of the downstream processes yielding synthetic fuels or a range of chemicals. Discussion will include the current capabilities at CNL and Canada to enable Net-Zero demonstration opportunities for Canada.

Suppiah.png
Sam Suppiah Technical Manager, Hydrogen and Tritium Technologies Directorate Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL)
Gord Crawford 300x300
Gord Crawford President and Chief Operating Officer Expander Energy Inc.
  • 3 30 PM

Understanding Hydrogen Permeation in Metallic Materials

Transportation

Hydrogen has a high rate of permeation through metallic materials relative to other common fuels, presenting a unique challenge that differentiates hydrogen service from conventional hydrocarbons....

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Transportation

Understanding Hydrogen Permeation in Metallic Materials

  • pr-alarm3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

Hydrogen has a high rate of permeation through metallic materials relative to other common fuels, presenting a unique challenge that differentiates hydrogen service from conventional hydrocarbons. Accounting for hydrogen permeation has important implications for safe and efficient design and operation of hydrogen service infrastructure. Permeation is the process by which a fluid or gas passes through a solid, such as the slow leak of air through the wall of a balloon. The relative ease of permeation is known as “permeability.” The permeability of a gas into a metallic material is related to the diffusivity of the gas molecules and the solubility of these molecules in the metallic material. The physical process is often described using a combination of Fick’s First Law of Diffusion and Sievert’s Law of Solubility. However, these fundamental physical laws are commonly implemented with assumptions, such as ideal gas behaviour or diffusion through the metal is the rate-limiting step. It is essential to understand these assumptions and their limitations to ensure that the governing equations are only used where applicable. The influence of temperature and pressure should also be accounted for when evaluating hydrogen permeability. The effect of temperature on hydrogen permeation is often approximated by the Arrhenius equation ? a formulation commonly used to describe the exponential relation between the rate of a physical or chemical process, the process temperature, and a process activation energy. Pressure effects, sometimes resulting in non-ideal gas behaviour, can be primarily accounted for using the Abel-Nobel equation of state. The effect of material properties on hydrogen permeation is another important consideration. Hydrogen permeability in various metals may be quantitatively compared at any given design temperature and pressure to inform material selection. Types of steel, such as carbon steels, micro-alloyed steels, and stainless steels, are particularly important for most applications. Furthermore, the microstructural phases in a steel, such as austenite and martensite, influence hydrogen permeation and may be controlled to produce steels with different levels of hydrogen permeability. Practical design and operation considerations related to hydrogen permeation should also include an evaluation of safety, potential loss of product, and possible material embrittlement. Mitigation techniques, such as the use of low-permeability liners or coatings, may be considered. This presentation will provide an overview of these permeation-related considerations and a practical design example related to hydrogen service with quantitative results to illustrate how this knowledge may be applied.

Lowell McAllister 300x300
Lowell McAllister Junior Researcher C-FER Technologies Inc.
  • 3 30 PM

The Challenges of Net-Zero Hydrogen and Oxygen Production

Production

Increasing Canada’s supply of net-zero hydrogen is critical to meeting both Federal and provincial emission goals. IEPS Canada Ltd. is developing a net-zero hydrogen and oxygen production facility...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Production

The Challenges of Net-Zero Hydrogen and Oxygen Production

  • pr-alarm3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

Increasing Canada’s supply of net-zero hydrogen is critical to meeting both Federal and provincial emission goals. IEPS Canada Ltd. is developing a net-zero hydrogen and oxygen production facility in southern Alberta, with the first phase of the facility expected to be on-line in early 2024. As the market for net-zero hydrogen and oxygen grows IEPS will increase the production capacity in stages and by 2030 the facility will reach its expected full capacity of 50,000 tonnes of hydrogen and 400,000 tonnes of oxygen per year. The facility will use electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen is a basic feedstock used in the production of ammonia, petroleum upgrading, and other important basic chemicals used for everything from pharmaceuticals to plastics and may become an important transportation fuel. Oxygen is used in production of chemicals like ethylene oxide and hydrogen peroxide, in sewage and water treating processes and medical treatments. Alberta currently produces 2.4 million tonnes of “grey” hydrogen for industrial purposes and IEPS sees the combination of net-zero hydrogen and oxygen as the basis for a viable new industry in Alberta This paper will explore the issues that will need to be addressed for IEPS to deliver secure, economic net-zero hydrogen and oxygen to market. To date IEPS has secured a license for the water required to reach full capacity and engaged Black and Veatch Canada as its EPC contractor and Siemens Energy Canada as its primary equipment supplier.

Greg Baden 300x300
Greg Baden President IEPS Canada Ltd.
  • 4 00 PM

Methodical Approach for the Evaluation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Powertrain Concepts for Mobility Applications

Transportation

The stringent and continuously increasing CO2 emission legislation requests zero-emission powertrains for mobility applications and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) represent a promising solutio...

  • locationSalon 8
  • small-arm4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Transportation

Methodical Approach for the Evaluation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Powertrain Concepts for Mobility Applications

  • pr-alarm4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 8

The stringent and continuously increasing CO2 emission legislation requests zero-emission powertrains for mobility applications and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) represent a promising solution to achieve these targets. Addressing the technological advantages of fuel cell powertrains necessitates customized solutions for a specific application to achieve lowest fuel consumption and costs. In this work, different hydrogen fuel cell powertrain concepts for mobility applications consisting of a fuel cell system, hydrogen storage system and traction battery are analysed and compared, using a holistic development methodology. The techno-economic key attributes of the powertrain are determined based on system requirements for FC-range-extender, FC-mid-size and FC-dominant topologies, covering the entire range of fuel cell powertrain concepts and identifying the respective advantages and disadvantages. The methodical approach consists of two parts: (1) A comprehensive powertrain simulation model to estimate power, efficiency and range. As simulation input, representative drive cycles based on usage profiles are evaluated to estimate vehicle performance and hydrogen fuel consumption, defining the optimum configuration between fuel cell system, hydrogen storage system and battery size. (2) For the assessment of mass, volume and costs, a virtual generic powertrain model with products off-the-shelf is used. The cost estimation for fuel cell powertrains is based on a calculated bottom-up approach for future market sales figures and validated by several estimates found in literature. The results are based on two vehicle classes, namely all-terrain-vehicles (ATVs) and heavy-duty trucks and evaluate the powertrain concepts with regard to volume, mass and costs by a break-even-point-analysis. With respect to ATVs the results show that the BEV is sufficient for short distances and represents the cheapest option for short ranges below the average usage profile. Whereas the FCEV features the most cost-efficient technology at higher ranges, close to or above typically usage profiles for this application. Thus, the higher the range the higher the cost advantage of FCEV compared to BEV. In terms of total system volume, which is important for system integration to the vehicle body, the powertrain of the BEV needs less space compared to FCEV. In contrary, the FCEV concepts are characterized by a lower total powertrain weight. For heavy duty-trucks, powertrain weight and total costs (manufacture and operation) are decisive and are strongly dependent on the usage profile. The results show that the operation of hydrogen powered trucks will be price competitive compared to the battery-electric technology. Moreover, the efficiency advantage of the purely battery-electric powertrain comes at the cost of system weight, which is crucial for the additional payload of goods. It is also evident, that a higher market penetration is beneficial for FCEVs and leads to further reduction of manufacturing costs (fuel cell and hydrogen storage) due to economies of scale.

Marie Macherhammer 300x300
Marie Macherhammer Area Manager, Department Electrochemical Technologies HyCentA Research GmbH
  • 4 00 PM

Photocatalytic Production Processes to Decarbonize the Chemicals Industry

Production

Modern society is built on a foundation of petroleum & petrochemical products. From transportation fuels to toothbrushes, cell phones to cosmetics, molecules derived from hydrocarbons are ubiquitou...

  • locationSalon 9
  • small-arm4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
wednesday April 27, 2022
Production

Photocatalytic Production Processes to Decarbonize the Chemicals Industry

  • pr-alarm4:00 PM - 4:30 PM
  • pr-locationSalon 9

Modern society is built on a foundation of petroleum & petrochemical products. From transportation fuels to toothbrushes, cell phones to cosmetics, molecules derived from hydrocarbons are ubiquitous, and often invisible to the consumer. The dominant paradigm for producing most of these products are high temperature processes that depend on fossil fuel combustion, a reality that stands at odds with the threat of climate change. In its 6th assessment report, the IPCC stated that human activity has been the driver behind observed global warming effects over the past 150 years. Broad alignment with this assertion has motivated decarbonization efforts focused on electrification of power and mobility but with few solutions provided for “hard-to-abate” sectors reliant on inexpensive petrochemicals as fuels / feedstocks. These sectors support nearly 30% of GHG emissions1 with 5.8% of global CO2eq emissions directly attributed to refining & petrochemical processes2; for assets responsible for trillions in global GDP, decarbonization is proving to be difficult and expensive. While there is some momentum to decarbonize the feedstocks for chemical processes (recycled materials and bio-based inputs), replacing the combustion fuels is proving to be more difficult. Industrial electric heating technology is costly, and not mature enough to provide sufficient temperatures to power production at scale. Simply put, it is cheaper to combust fossil fuels for heat instead of relying on electricity. To successfully electrify chemical manufacturing, a completely novel solution is required. Houston-based Syzygy Plasmonics, is developing an alternate solution centered around cutting-edge photocatalytic technology with reactors powered by light instead of heat. Together, these technologies enable low-cost reactions under milder operating conditions compared to traditional thermal catalysis resulting in opex and capex savings. Syzygy’s photocatalytic steam methane reforming (P-SMR) process, for example, eliminates combustion emissions and lowers the electricity required to make hydrogen, resulting in a viable low-carbon and cost-effective production technology today. Along with high conversion and energy efficiencies, Syzygy’s P-SMR reactor also produces an ultra-concentrated stream of CO2, allowing for easy utilization or capture. Syzygy’s platform technology can be applied in the same way and achieve similar advantages for other foundational chemical reactions; such broad adoption will enable an orderly and smooth energy transition. As the need for immediate action to ward of the worst effects of climate change grows, Syzygy’s novel photocatalytic platform stands ready to scale and be deployed globally to start reducing emissions and prevent gigatons of carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere.

Murtuza Marfani 300x300
Murtuza Marfani Director of Corporate Development Syzygy Plasmonics
  • 4 30 PM
Day Two of Technical Courses Concludes