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A New Era for Canadian Energy is Now
April 26-28, 2022
Edmonton, Canada

Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage

Leading the Path to Net-Zero Emissions by 2050

As Canada navigates through the energy transition, the need for innovation and technologies in carbon capture and storage (CCS) is in demand.

According to the IEA, global demand for hydrogen continues to rise and is almost entirely supplied from fossil fuels, with 6% of global natural gas and 2% of global coal going to hydrogen production.

As most hydrogen is produced from fossil fuels, continued investment and support in CCS is needed as Canada works towards net zero in 2050.

The Canadian Hydrogen Convention will feature exhibitors contributing to the decarbonization of the energy industry, showcasing innovation and technologies in CCS.

Canada Emerged as Global Leader in CCS

Canada has emerged as a global leader in carbon capture and storage (according to a report by Wood Mackenzie), both in technology development and in public and private investments in large-scale CCS projects.

Investments in major carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) projects could reflect the incentives provided by the Canadian government, including carbon pricing and direct subsides for major CCUS projects, like the Alberta Carbon Trunk Line.

All major investments in carbon capture have been in Alberta (large oil and gas resources) and Saskatchewan (coal industry). CCUS allows these industries to produce power or petroleum products while sequestering much of the CO2 emissions.

Major projects already in operation in Canada include:

Candice Paton, Director, Regulatory Affairs & External Relations at Enhance Energy,  discusses the Alberta Carbon Trunk Line, advancements across the carbon value chain, and working with the Government of Alberta and AER to build an MMV (monitoring, measurement and verification) plan to verify offset credits in Alberta.